Archive for January 3, 2012

For the Explorer

What do we allow our children to read?  While in the past social standards might have allowed a lax attitude when it came to censorship of reading material, things have changed quite a bit in the last 15 years.  There are so many choices when buying magazines for our children.  Though it is in the end a parent’s responsibility to control the content that reaches their children, there are some publishers and magazines that have a very long track record of putting out solid material that is clean and wholesome.

Maybe you are looking for something fun and educational.  Highlights, for example has been around for well over 50 years and offers those two things without any fluff or pointless material.  On the other hand, you have pure entertainment with a little bit of social commentary in magazines such as Cracked and Mad.  Finally, for the technically minded youth there are some great publications geared for both children and adults.  Popular Mechanics has always been a staple in this genre.

Magazines for the Explorer

  1. Highlights for Children is a great magazine that combines jokes and riddles with science puzzles and projects.  Regular features include the “Goofus and Gallant” stories that most of us remember from our own childhood.  These two have been teaching moral lessons with a humorous twist for many years now.  Hidden pictures and word searches sharpen young minds and the “replay value” of each issue is incredible.  This magazine is definitely a chart topper when looking for new material for your young ones.


  1. National Geographic Kids Magazine gives Highlights a run for their money any day.  National Geographic does a superb job of combining learning with fun, though it is geared towards a little older crowd (6+ yrs).  Covering such a broad spectrum, one issue may touch base on any number of topics.  Often you will find stories on animals, physics, biology, technology, and more in a single issue.  They also tend to include inserts like puzzles and trading cards that your child might take with them after they have finished the current issue.